~ Robin Sloan on Gone Home (via alexanderchee)

On the surface of contemporary life, the compression of multi-megapixel cameras into networked smartphones that feed data-streams like Instagram via one-click apps suggest those premonitions were well founded. What excites me and some other poets who have been at the forefront of the Conceptual Writing scene is a simple observation that problematises such premonitions and the visual bias they ground. In short, although the surface of life is constantly being flooded with images, its depths, structures, flows and our interactions with them have proved to be more dependent than ever on written language, not least because all computational data is a kind of emic, alphanumeric code. The really new features of twenty-first century life are reforming life under the surface – in relational networks that we only have limp metaphors to describe, like ‘the cloud’ – and so we need to read everything and anything legible below the surface in ways that go beyond seeing. As writers we seem to ask: what might it be interesting to write if we were to wager that, rather than being over-written by the visual, the contemporary world has become more fundamentally textualised than any period before it? And as readers we seem to ask: what kinds of literacies might we need to read these new textualities forming on and below the surface?

~ Nick Thurston @ The White Review, September 2014

Trebbe Johnson, Lily Yeh, and Glenn Albrecht Discuss Solastalgia at Orion Magazine, 2012

“WHAT I SAID TO THE WIFE IN BED: Am I getting grayer? The children told me I have more gray here. (I touched the side of my head to show her where the children had pointed.)

WHAT THE WIFE SAID: No, you don’t have more gray than usual. It’s just that children are taller. They can see all the gray they have never been able to see before.”
— Yannick Murphy, The Call
“As the dog awakens, the city awakens. Crust on its windshields and hungry. Snorting plumes of frustration in the harbor. Scratching its traffic on the expressway. Bone cold and grouchy, from the toes of its stadium to the strands of its El. One by one each Main Line town revs its city-bound trains. Against the light of dawn, their track lamps are as worthless as rich girls.

Good morning, the city says. Fuck you.”
— Marie-Helene Bertino, 2 A.M. at the Cat’s Pajamas

The article’s in Norwegian, but it’s about researchers using this costume to test how reindeer react to the presence of a polar bear — and winning an Ig Nobel Prize, no less.

Reminds me of a classic Canadian film:

“Part of the problem that the industry faces is that the rush of small magazines that are appearing have terrific intentions, and their editorial mission statements are very noble and should be applauded, but what’s missing is publishing expertise. There are no publishers at any of the magazines that you’ve mentioned and I think that’s very revealing about the attitude emerging in the small magazines. This Etsy-based marketing strategy. I wouldn’t even call any of them marketing strategies, to be blunt about it.”
new-aesthetic:

Carpets by Faig Ahmed.
new-aesthetic:

Carpets by Faig Ahmed.
new-aesthetic:

Carpets by Faig Ahmed.
new-aesthetic:

Carpets by Faig Ahmed.
new-aesthetic:

Carpets by Faig Ahmed.
new-aesthetic:

Carpets by Faig Ahmed.