For this body of work, I consider human architecture and natural architecture to be engaged in an ongoing battle. For every pile there is a pit, for every pit there is a pile. But the rock got here first. And then humans stepped in to gash and cut at it, make roads and buildings and myriad other structures. And then the people left, taking their towns and tools with them and, after a time, nature again got the upper hand. Now, people are back with swimming pools and tennis courts, cheaply constructed houses that use the quarry sites as recreational focal points, curated vistas, landfills, storage units, car impounding lots and golf courses. Do I think a quarry should remain a quarry?  I do–despite the interesting visuals these transformations provide.
~ Elena Dorfman

For this body of work, I consider human architecture and natural architecture to be engaged in an ongoing battle. For every pile there is a pit, for every pit there is a pile. But the rock got here first. And then humans stepped in to gash and cut at it, make roads and buildings and myriad other structures. And then the people left, taking their towns and tools with them and, after a time, nature again got the upper hand. Now, people are back with swimming pools and tennis courts, cheaply constructed houses that use the quarry sites as recreational focal points, curated vistas, landfills, storage units, car impounding lots and golf courses. Do I think a quarry should remain a quarry?  I do–despite the interesting visuals these transformations provide.

~ Elena Dorfman

Notes

  1. chavagb reblogged this from shimmer
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